The IOC takes a holiday from sport to work on politics

The IOC's signing ceremony with the two Koreas (courtesy IOC/Greg Martin)

TSX HEADLINES – for Jan. 22, 2018: The International Olympic Committee took a break from worrying about the technical details of the upcoming PyeongChang Winter Games and played politics.

President Thomas Bach held a conference and signed an agreement to allow North Korea to participate in the Winter Games and there was finally some movement (and details) on the invitation process for Russian athletes considered free of doping to the Games. But not everyone was impressed.

We examine the IOC’s position – as it sees it – in our Lane One commentary, plus news and results of 18 sports in this 40-page issue:

(1) SCENE & HEARD: A world record from U.S. sprint star Christian Coleman; will Tour de France & Vuelta a Espana winner Chris Froome be suspended; a sudden loss for USA hockey; four-time Olympic medalist Julia Mancuso retires.

(2) ALPINE SKIING: If you had any doubt about Lindsey Vonn being ready for the Games, forget it. See what she, Mikaela Shiffrin and Jackie Wiles did in Cortina d’Ampezzo!

(3) BOBSLEIGH & SKELETON: A seasonal World Cup silver medal for U.S. driver Elana Meyers Taylor, and now on to PyeongChang.

(4) FOOTBALL: Good start for the U.S. women in 2018: a 5-1 pounding of 12th-ranked Denmark in San Diego.

(5) LUGE: A sensational, world-class victory for American luger Summer Britcher! What does it mean?

Plus plenty of coverage of U.S. Olympic qualifying in Freestyle Skiing and Snowboard!

This issue includes THE BIG PICTURE, a rapid-read status report on Olympic sport; SCENE & HEARD with news on Athletics ~ Cycling ~ Ice Hockey ~ Skiing; SCOREBOARD reports on Alpine Skiing ~ Archery ~ Biathlon ~ Bobsled & Skeleton ~ Cross Country ~ Curling ~ Cycling ~ Fencing ~ Figure Skating ~ Football ~ Freestyle Skiing ~ Judo ~ Luge ~ Nordic Combined ~ Ski Jumping ~ Snowboard ~ Speed Skating ~ Table Tennis, and AGENDA, our calendar of top-level international events.

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