ATHLETICS: Kovacs wins greatest shot put ever at 75-2; Hassan 3:51.96 in 1,500, U.S. men win in 37.10!

World Champion again: American Joe Kovacs wins a historic shot put competition at 22.91 m (75-2)! (Photo: IAAF)

What a day!

Even before the season started, the top men’s shot putters were talking about distances which had not been approached since Randy Barnes’s world-record year of 1990. They backed it up at the 2019 IAAF World Championships in Doha (QAT) with the greatest shot put competition ever.

It started on the very first throw, by Rio Olympic champ Ryan Crouser of the U.S. The world leader coming in, he spun out to a sterling 22.36 m (73-4 1/2). That would win most competitions with ease, but not on this day.

Crouser’s lead didn’t even last through the first round. New Zealand’s defending champion, Tom Walsh, exploded with a monster throw of 22.90 m (75-1 3/4), moving him to no. 3 all-time with the fourth-longest throw in history. That wouldn’t be enough either.

Crouser responded with a huge foul to start the second round, then Brazil’s Darlan Romani shoved the ball well beyond the 22 m line, and moved past Crouser into second at 22.53 m (77-2 1/2).

There were no improvements in the third round, although Crouser threw 22.36 m (73-4 1/2) again. But he was fired up in the fourth round, spinning even more tightly to get the shot to a sensational 22.71 m (74-6 1/4) that moved him up to second. Walsh fouled again for the third straight throw. Joe Kovacs of the U.S., the 2015 World Champion, improved to 21.95 m (72-0 1/4) and was a solid fourth, but still out of the medals.

The fifth round also saw no improvements and the tension was building into the final round. Kovacs came up for his final toss and spun hard before releasing the shot cleanly and with full power, and it landed well beyond the 22 m line, sparking a huge celebration from a big man.

He had reason to be happy: 22.91 m (75-2), moving him to equal-third all-time, with the equal-fourth-best throw in history. No one had thrown that far since Barnes in 1990. But there were still three throwers left.

Crouser was next and his concentration was evident as he slowly wound up and also got full extension behind his throw, landing way beyond the 22 m line. Everyone got quiet waiting for the distance and it came up as 22.90 (75-1 3/4), equal to Walsh’s mark, but moving Crouser into second based on his second-best throw of 22.71 m (74-6 1/4) in the fourth round.

Romani fouled on his last attempt and Walsh sent a screamer out toward the 22 m line, but also fouled and left Kovacs with his second world title in five years. No one had ever lost a competition throwing 22.41 m (73-6 1/4) or better; Romani reached 22.53 m (73-11) and got a handshake for fourth. Easily the greatest shot competition in history.

But there was a lot more.

After years and years of frustration, American fans had a cathartic experience in the men’s 4×100 m relay. The U.S. finally put together a quality set of passes and with 100 m winner Christian Coleman, 100 m silver medalist Justin Gatlin, Mike Rodgers and 200 m champion Noah Lyles, the result was an American Record of 37.10, the no. 3 performance of all time.

Coleman screaming out of the blocks from lane eight and made up the stagger on China outside him within 30 m. The pass to Gatlin wasn’t perfect, but the speed was good and Gatlin flew down the backstraight with the lead. Gatlin’s pass to Rodgers was good and he handed to Lyles with a clear advantage that was not dented by the chasing British.

The 37.10 time erases the American Record of 37.38 from the 2012 Olympic heats and 2015 World Relays, but is actually not the fastest ever by a U.S. team. The second-place U.S. team behind Jamaica’s world record at the 2012 Olympic final ran 37.04, but third-leg runner Tyson Gay was disqualified later for doping. But this was the first U.S. win in the World Championships since 2007. Ahhh…

The women’s 4×100 m was a showcase for Jamaica as expected. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce broke the race open on the second leg and Jonielle Smith ran a brilliant turn to give Shericka Jackson a huge lead on the anchor at 41.44, the eighth-fastest performance ever. Daryll Nieta brought the British home second (41.85) and the U.S. – with Dezerea Bryant, Teahna Daniels, Morolake Akinosun and Kiara Parker – finished with the bronze medal in 42.10.

The women’s 1,500 m can be summed up in two words: Sifan Hassan. After running 3:59.1 in her final 1,500 m of the 10,000 m, she was the clear favorite to double. But what she did was stunning, leading almost wire to wire:

● 400 m: 63.53
● 800 m: 62.42 (2:05.95)
● 1,200 m: 61.46 (3:07.41)
● Last 400 m in 59.34

Add it all up and she finished in 3:51.95, making her the sixth-fastest performer (and performance) in history. She ran away from a world-class field, leading eight others under four minutes! Defending champion Faith Kipyegon (KEN) held on for second at 3:54.22 (no. 12 all-time) and Ethiopia’s Gudaf Tsegay had a lifetime best 3:54.38 for third.

American Shelby Houlihan was well positioned to strike for a medal, but the pace was so fast that her kick was blunted and she finished a clear fourth in an American Record of 3:54.99, ahead of Britain’s Laura Muir (3:55.76). Jenny Simpson ran a seasonal best of 3:58.42 but faded from contention with 300 m left, finishing eighth. Astonishing.

The women’s 5,000 m was another exercise in individual brilliance, by defending champion Hellen Obiri of Kenya. Disappointed after her fifth-place performance in the 10,000 m, she was determined not to leave this race to the kickers and set a strong pace.

With three laps to go, she had shaken off everyone except German Konstanze Klosterhalfen, Kenyans Margaret Kipkemboi and Lilian Rengeruk and Ethiopians Tsehay Gemechu and Fantu Worku. The order remained the same through the bell and then the race went into overdrive with 300 m to go.

Obiri was in a full sprint and put distance between her and the rest, with Klosterhalfen and Kipkemboi chasing, but unable to make a dent in Obiri’s lead. Kipkemboi moved into second on the finishing straight and they finished that way: Obiri in a meet record of 14:26.72, Kipkemboi with a PR 14:27.49 and Klosterhalfen in 14:28.43.

Americans Karissa Schweizer and Elinor Purrier finished ninth and 11th in lifetime bests of 14:45.18 (no. 5 all-time U.S. performer) and 14:58.17 (no. 7).

The women’s triple jump was all about defending champion Yulimar Rojas of Venezuela. She took the lead immediately at 14.87 m (48-9 1/2) and then ended any suspense at 15.37 m (50-5 1/4) in the second round, and it was over. Jamaica’s Shanieka Ricketts won the silver at 14.92 m (48-11 1/2).

Rojas’ mark was the no. 4 jump in history and just behind her monster 15.41 m (50-6 3/4) in early September.

In the qualifying:

Men/4×400 m: The U.S. almost dropped the stick on the second pass, from Vernon Norwood to Wil London III. London took off a little too quickly for the tiring Norwood and had to stop to get the baton, leaving him in fourth instead of first. But a 44.8 leg put the U.S. well in front and Nathan Strother (44.76) had no trouble winning in 2:59.89, with Colombia second in 3:01.06.

Jamaica won the second heat with Javon Francis finishing in 3:00.76, just ahead of a frantic anchor by Kevin Borlee to bring Belgium in at 3:00.87.

Men/Javelin: The best throw in qualifying came from Germany’s Johannes Vetter at 89.35 m (293-1), followed by Estonia’s world-leading Magnus Kirt (88.36 m/289-11). The surprise was seeing Rio Olympic champ Thomas Rohler (GER) miss the final at 79.23 m (259-11).

Women/100 m hurdles: The shock was the disqualification of 2016 Rio champion Brianna McNeal of the U.S. for a false start in heat two. American Nia Ali won the first heat in 12.59, favorite Danielle Williams (JAM) won heat three in 12.51 and Keni Harrison of the U.S. won the fourth heat in 12.55. The fastest run of the day was Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan in heat five, winning in 12.48. The semis and finals will be tomorrow.

Women/4×400 m: The U.S. was impressive, especially Allyson Felix’s 49.8 second leg that gave the Americans a big lead and Kendall Ellis and Courtney Okolo (49.85) brought it home in a world-leading 3:22.96. That was more than two seconds ahead of Great Britain (3:24.99).

Jamaica had the world lead with its 3:23.64 in the first heat, with Stephenie Ann McPherson on anchor, ahead of Poland (3:25.78).

Women/Long Jump: No problem for world leader Malaika Mihambo of Germany, the qualifying leader at 6.98 m (22-10 3/4), but behind her was chaos. Four-time World Champion Brittney Reese had trouble all day, ended up 13th at 6.52 m (21-4 3/4) and missed qualifying by one centimeter!

But Tori Bowie, who scratched out of the 100 meter semis – where she was defending champion – was third in the qualifying at 6.77 m (22-2 1/2) and moves on to tomorrow’s final.

The crowd was not as large as on Friday, but better than the early days. Summaries so far:

IAAF World Championships
Doha (QAT) ~ 27 September-6 October 2019
(Full results here)

Men

100 m (wind +0.6 m/s): 1. Christian Coleman (USA), 9.76; 2. Justin Gatlin (USA), 9.89; 3. Andre De Grasse (CAN), 9.90; 4. Akani Simbine (RSA), 9.93; 5. Yohan Blake (JAM), 9.97; 6. Zharnel Hughes (GBR), 10.03; 7. Flilppo Tortu (ITA), 10.07; 8. Aaron Brown (CAN), 10.08.

200 m (+0.3): 1. Noah Lyles (USA), 19.83; 2. Andre De Grasse (CAN), 19.95; 3. Alex Quinonez (ECU), 19.98; 4. Adam Gemili (GBR), 20.03; 5. Ramil Guliyev (TUR), 20.07; 6. Aaron Brown (CAN), 20.10; 7. Zhenye Xie (CHN), 20.14; 8. Kyle Greaux (TTO), 20.39.

400 m: 1. Steven Gardiner (BAH), 43.48; 2. Anthony Zambrano (COL), 44.15; 3. Fred Kerley (USA), 44.17; 4. Denish Gaye (JAM), 44.46; 5. Kirani James (GRN), 44.54; 6. Emanuel Korir (KEN), 44.94; 7. Machel Cedenio (TTO), 45.30; 8. Akeem Bloomfield (JAM), 45.36.

800 m: 1. Donavan Brazier (USA), 1:42.34 (American Record; old, 1:42.60, Johnny Gray, 1985); 2. Amel Tuka (BIH), 1:43.47; 3. Ferguson Rotich (KEN), 1:43.83; 4. Bryce Hoppel (USA), 1:44.25; 5. Wesley Vazquez (PUR), 1:44.48; 6. Adrian Ben (ESP), 1:45.58; 7. Marco Arop (CAN), 1:45.78; 8. Clayton Murphy (USA), 1:47.84.

3,000 m Steeple: 1. Conseslus Kipruto (KEN), 8:01.35; 2. Lamecha Girma (ETH), 8:01.36; 3. Soufiane El Bakkali (MAR), 8:03.76; 4. Getnet Wale (ETH), 8:05.21; 5. Djilati Bedrani (FRA), 8:05.23; 6. Ben Kigen (KEN), 8:06.95; 7. Abraham Kibiwot (KEN), 8:08.52; 8. Hillary Bor (USA), 8:09.33. Also: 10. Stanley Kibenei (USA), 8:11.15; … 12. Andy Bayer (USA), 8:12.47.

5,000 m: 1. Muktar Edris (ETH), 12:58.85; 2. Selemon Barega (ETH), 12:59.70; 3. Mo Ahmed (CAN), 13:01.11; 4. Telahun Haile Bekele (ETH), 13:02.29; 5. Jakob Ingebrigtsen (NOR), 13:02.93; 6. Jacob Krop (KEN), 13:03.08; 7. Paul Chelimo (USA), 13:04.60; 8. Nicholas Kimeli (KEN), 13:05.27. Also: 11. Hassan Mead (USA), 13:27.05.

110 m hurdles (+0.6): 1. Grant Holloway (USA), 13.10; 2. Sergey Shubenkov (RUS), 13.15; 3. Pascal Martinot-Lagarde (FRA), 13.18; 4. Wenjun Xie (CHN), 13.29; 5. Orlando Ortega (ESP), 13.30; 6. Shane Brathwaite (BAR), 13.61; 7. Devon Allen (USA), 13.70; 8. Milan Trajkovic (CYP), 13.87; disqualified – Omar McLeod (JAM).

400 m hurdles: 1. Karsten Warholm (NOR), 47.42; 2. Rai Benjamin (USA), 47.66; 3. Abderrahmane Samba (QAT), 48.03; 4. Kyron McMaster (IVB), 48.10; 5. T.J. Holmes (USA), 48.20; 6. Yasmani Copello (TUR), 48.25; 7. Alison Dos Santos (BRA), 48.28; 8. Abdelmalik Lahoulou (ALG), 49.46.

20 km Walk: 1. Toshikazu Yamanishi (JPN), 1:26:34; 2. Vasiliy Mizinov (RUS), 1:26:49; 3. Perseus Karlstrom (SWE), 1:27:00; 4. Christopher Linke (GER), 1:27:19; 5. Salih Korkmaz (TUR), 1:27:35; 6. Koki Ineda (JPN), 1:29:02; 7. Tom Bosworth (GBR), 1:29:34; 8. Kaihua Wang (CHN), 1:29:52.

50 km Walk: 1. Yusuke Suzuki (JPN), 4:04:20; 2. Joao Vieira (POR), 4:04:59; 3. Evan Dunfee (CAN), 4:05:02; 4. Wenbin Niu (CHN), 4:05:36; 5. Yadong Luo (CHN), 4:06:49; 6. Brendan Boyce (IRL), 4:07:06; 7. Carl Dohmann (GER), 4:10:22; 8. Jesus Angel Garcia (ESP), 4:11:28.

4×100 m: 1. United States (Christian Coleman, Justin Gatlin, Mike Rodgers, Noah Lyles), 37.10 (American Record; old, 37.38, National Team, 2012 and 2015); 2. Great Britain (Gemili, Hughes, Kilty, Mitchell-Blake), 37.36; 3. Japan (Tada, Shiraishi, Kiryu, Sani Brown), 37.43; 4. Brazil, 37.72; 5. South Africa, 37.73; 6. China, 38.07; Netherlands was disqualified; France, did not finish.

High Jump: 1. Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT), 2.37 m (7-9 1/4); 2. Mikhail Akimenko (RUS), 2.35 m (7-8 1/2); 3. Ilya Ivanyuk (RUS), 2.35 m (7-8 1/2); 4. Maksim Nedasekau (BLR), 2.33 m (7-7 3/4); 5. Luis Zayas (CUB), 2.30 m (7-6 1/2); 6. Brandon Starc (AUS), 2.30 m (7-6 1/2); 7. Michael Mason (CAN), 2.30 m (7-6 1/2); 8. Hup Wei Lee (MAS), 2.27 m (7-5 1/4). Also: 11. Jeron Robinson (USA), 2.24 m (7-4 1/4).

Pole Vault: 1. Sam Kendricks (USA), 5.97 m (19-7); 2. Mondo Duplantis (SWE), 5.97 m (19-7); 3. Piotr Lisek (POL), 5.87 m (19-3); 4. Bo Lita Baehre (GER), 5.70 m (18-8 1/4); 5. Thiago Braz (BRA), 5.70 m (18-8 1/4); 6. tie, Raphael Holzdeppe (GER) and Valentin Lavillenie (FRA), 5.70 m (18-8 1/4); 8. Claudio Stecchi (ITA), 5.70 m (18-8 1/4). Also: 10. Cole Walsh (USA), 5.55 m (18-2 1/2).

Long Jump: 1. Tajay Gayle (JAM), 8.69 m (28-6 1/4); 2. Jeff Henderson (USA), 8.39 m (27-6 1/2); 3. Juan Miguel Echevarria (CUB), 8.34 m (27-4 1/2); 4. Luvo Manyonga (RSA), 8.28 m (27-2); 5. Ruswahl Samaai (RSA), 8.23 m (27-0); 6. Jianan Wang (CHN), 8.20 m (26-11); 7. Eusebio Caceres (ESP), 8.01 m (26-3 1/2); 8. Yuki Hashioka (JPN), 7.97 m (26-1 3/4).

Triple Jump: 1. Christian Taylor (USA), 17.92 m (58-9 1/2); 2. Will Claye (USA), 17.74 m (58-2 1/2); 3. Hugues Zango (BUR), 17.66 m (57-11 1/4); 4. Pedro Pablo Pichardo (POR), 17.62 m (57-9 3/4); 5. Cristian Napoles (CUB), 17.38 m (57-0 1/4); 6. Donald Scott (USA), 17.17 m (56-4); 7. Alexis Copello (AZE), 17.10 m (57-1 1/4); 8. Jordan Diaz Fortun (CUB), 17.06 m (55-11 3/4).

Shot Put: 1. Joe Kovacs (USA), 22.91 m (75-2); 2. Ryan Crouser (USA), 22.90 m (75-1 3/4); 3. Tom Walsh (NZL), 22.90 m (75-1 3/4); 4. Darlan Romani (BRA), 22.53 m (7311); 5. Darrell Hill (USA), 21.65 m (71-0 1/2); 6. Konrad Bukowiecki (POL), 21.46 m (); 7. Jacko Gill (NZL), 21.45 m (70-4 1/2); 8. Chukwuebeka Enekwechi (NGR), 21.18 m (66-2 1/2).

Discus: 1. Daniel Stahl (SWE), 67.59 m (221-9); 2. Fedrick Dacres (JAM), 66.94 m (219-7); 3. Lukas Weisshaidinger (AUT), 66.82 m (219-3); 4. Alin Firfirica (ROU), 66.46 m (218-0); 5. Apostolos Parellis (CYP), 66.32 m (217-7); 6. Matthew Denny (AUS), 65.43 m (214-8); 7. Ehsan Hadadi (IRI), 65.16 m (213-9); 8. Martin Wierig (GER), 64.98 m (213-2). Also: 11. Sam Mattis (USA), 63.42 m (208-1).

Hammer: 1. Pawel Fajdek (POL), 80.50 (264-1); 2. Quentin Bigot (FRA), 78.19 m (256-6); 3. Bence Halasz (HUN), 78.18 m (256-6); 4. Wojciech Nowicki (POL), 77.69 m (254-10); 5. Mykhaylo Kokhan (UKR), 77.39 m (253-11); 6. Eivind Henriksen (NOR), 77.38 m (253-10); 7. Javier Cienfuegos (ESP), 76.57 m (251-2); 8. Hleb Dudarau (BLR), 76.00 m (249-4). Also: 11. Rudy Winkler (USA), 75.20 m (246-9).

Decathlon: 1. Niklas Kaul (GER), 8,691; 2. Maicel Uibo (EST), 8,604; 3. Damian Warner (CAN), 8,529; 4. Ilya Shkurenyov (RUS), 8,494; 5. Pierce LaPage (CAN), 8,445; 6. Janek Oiglane (EST), 8,297; 7. Pieter Braun (NED), 8,222; 8. Solomon Simmons (USA), 8,151. Also: 14. Harrison Williams (USA), 7,892.

Women

100 m (+0.1): 1. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM), 10.71; 2. Dina Asher-Smith (GBR), 10.83; 3. Marie-Josee Ta Lou (CIV), 10.90; 4. Elaine Thompson (JAM), 10.93; 5. Murielle Ahoure (CIV), 11.02; 6. Jonielle Smith (JAM), 11.06; 7. Teahna Daniels (USA), 11.19; did not start – Dafne Schippers (NED).

200 m (+0.9): 1. Dina Asher-Smith (GBR), 21.88; 2. Brittany Brown (USA), 22.22; 3. Mujinga Kambundji (SUI), 22.51; 4. Angie Annelus (USA), 22/59; 5. Dezerea Bryant (USA), 22.63; 6. Gina Bass (GAM), 22.71; 7. Ivet Lalova-Collio (BUL), 22.77; 8. Tynia Gaither (BAH), 22.90.

400 m: 1. Salwa Eid Naser (BAH), 48.14; 2. Shaunae Miller-Uibo (BAH), 48.37; 3. Shericka Jackson (JAM), 49.47; 4. Wadeline Jonathas (USA), 49.60; 5. Phyllis Francis (USA), 49.61; 6. Stephanie Ann McPherson (JAM), 50.89; 7. Justyna Swiety-Ersetic (POL), 50.95; 8. Iga Baumgart-Witen (POL), 51.29.

800 m: 1. Halimah Nakaayi (UGA), 1:58.04; 2. Raevyn Rogers (USA), 1:58.18; 3. Ajee Wilson (USA), 1:58.84; 4. Winnie Nanyondo (UGA), 1:59.18; 5. Eunice Sum (KEN), 1:59.71; 6. Natoya Goule (JAM), 2:00.11; 7. Rababe Arafi (MAR), 2:00.48; 8. Ce’Aira Brown (USA), 2:02.97.

1,500 m: 1. Sifan Hassan (NED), 3:51.95; 2. Faith Kipyegon (KEN), 3:54.22; 3. Gudaf Tsegay (ETH), 3:54.38; 4. Shelby Houlihan (USA), 3:54.99 (American Record; old, 3:56.29, Shannon Rowbury, 2015); 5. Laura Muir (GBR), 3:55.76; 6. Gabriela Dubues-Stafford (CAN), 3:56.12; 7. Winny Chebet (KEN), 3:58.20; 8. Jenny Simpson (USA), 3:58.42.

3,000 m Steeple: 1. Beatrice Chepkoech (KEN), 8:57.84; 2. Emma Coburn (USA), 9:02.35; 3. Gesa Krause (GER), 9:03.30; 4. Winfred Yavi (BRN), 9:05.68; 5. Peruth Chemutai (UGA), 9:11.08; 6. Courtney Frerichs (USA), 9:11.27; 7. Anna Moller (DEN), 9:13.46; 8. Hyvin Kiyeng (KEN), 9:13.53.

5,000 m: 1. Hellen Obiri (KEN), 14:26.72; 2. Margaret Kipkemboi (KEN), 14:27.49; 3. Konstanze Klosterhalfen (GER), 14:28.43; 4. Tsehay Gemechu (ETH), 14:29.60; 5. Lilian Rengeruk (KEN), 14:36.05; 6. Fantu Worku (ETH), 14:30.47; 7. Laura Weightman (GBR), 14:44.57; 8. Hawi Feysa (ETH), 14:44.92. Also: 9. Karissa Schweizer (USA), 14:45.18; … 11. Elinor Purrier (USA), 14:58.17.

10,000 m: 1. Hassan (NED), 30.17.62; 2. Letesenbet Gidey (ETH), 30:21.23; 3. Agnes Tirop (KEN), 30:25.20; 4. Rosemary Wanjiru (KEN), 30:35.75; 5. Obiri (KEN), 30:35.82; 6. Senbere Teferi (ETH), 30:44.23; 7. Susan Krumins (NED), 31:05.40; 8. Marielle Hall (USA), 31:05.71. Also: 9. Molly Huddle (USA), 31:07.24; 10. Emily Sisson (USA), 31:12.56.

Marathon: 1. Ruth Chepngetich (KEN), 2:32:43; 2. Rose Chelimo (BRN), 2:33:46; 3. Helelia Johannes (NAM), 2:34:15; 4. Edna Kiplagat (KEN), 2:35:36; 5. Volha Mazuronak (BLR), 2:36:21; 6. Roberta Groner (USA), 2:38:44; 7. Mizuki Tanimoto (JPN), 2:39:09; 8. Ji Hyang Kim (PRK), 2:41:24. Also: 13. Carrie Dimoff (USA), 2:44:35.

400 m hurdles: 1. Dalilah Muhammad (USA), 52.16 (World Record; old, 52.20, Muhammad, 2019); 2. Sydney McLaughlin (USA), 52.23; 3. Rushell Clayton (JAM), 53.74; 4. Lea Sprunger (SUI), 54.06; 5. Zuzana Hejnova (CZE), 54.23; 6. Ashley Spencer (USA), 54.45; 7. Anna Ryzhykova (UKR), 54.45; 8. Sage Watson (CAN), 54.82.

4×100 m: 1. Jamaica (Whyte, Fraser-Pryce, Smith, Jackson), 41.44; 2. Great Britain (Philip, Asher-Smith, Nelson, Neita), 41.85; 3. United States (Dezerea Bryant, Teahna Daniels, Morolake Akinosun, Kiara Parker), 42.10; 4. Switzerland, 42.18; 5. Germany, 42.48; 6. Trinidad & Tobago, 42.71; 7. Italy, 42.98; China was disqualified.

20 km Walk: 1. Hong Liu (CHN), 1:32:53; 2. Shenjie Qieyang (CHN), 1:33:10; 3. Liujing Yang (CHN), 1:33:17; 4. Erica Rocha de Sena (BRA), 1:33:36; 5. Sandra Arenas (COL), 1:34:16; 6. Kumiko Okada (JPN), 1:34:36; 7. Nanako Fujii (JPN), 1:34:50; 8. Maria Perez (ESP), 1:35:43. Also: 35. Maria Michta-Coffey (USA), 1:46:02.

50 km Walk: 1. Rui Liang (CHN), 4:23:26; 2. Maocuo Li (CHN), 4:26:40; 3. Elenorora Giorgi (ITA), 4:29:13; 4. Olena Sobchuk (UKR), 4:33:38; 5. Faying Ma (CHN), 4:34:56; 6. Khrystyna Yudkina (UKR), 4:36:00; 7. Magaly Bonilla (ECU), 4:37:03; 8. Julia Takacs (ESP), 4:38:20. Also: 17. Katie Burnett (USA), 5:23:05.

High Jump: 1. Mariya Lasitskene (RUS), 2.04 m (6-8 1/4); 2. Yaroslava Mahuchikh (UKR), 2.04 m (6-8 1/4); 3. Vashti Cunningham (USA), 2.00 m (6-6 3/4); 4. Yuliya Levchenko (UKR), 2./00 m (6-6 3/4); 5. Kamila Licwinko (POL), 1.98 m (6-6); 6. Karyna Demidik (BLR), 1.96 m (6-5); 7. Ana Simic (CRO), 1.93 m (6-4); 8. Ty Butts (USA), 1.93 m (6-4).

Pole Vault: 1. Anzhelika Sidorova (RUS), 4.95 m (16-2 3/4); 2. Sandi Morris (USA), 4.90 m (16-0 3/4); 3. Katerina Stefanidi (GRE), 4.85 m (15-11); 4. Holly Bradshaw (GBR), 4.80 m (15-9); 5. Alysha Newman (CAN), 4.80 m (15-9); 6. Angelica Bengtsson (SWE), 4.80 m (15-9); 7. tie, Iryna Zhuk (BLR), Jenn Suhr (USA) and Katie Nagetotte (USA), 4.70 m (15-5).

Triple Jump: 1. Yulimar Rojas (VEN), 15.37 m (50-5 1/4); 2. Shanieka Ricketts (JAM), 14.92 m (48-11 1/2); 3. Caterine Ibarguen (COL), 14.73 m (48-4); 4. Kimberly Williams (JAM), 14.64 m (48-0 1/2); 5. Olha Saladukha (UKR), 14.52 m (47-7 3/4); 6. Ana Peleteiro (ESP), 14.47 m (47-5 3/4); 7. Keturah Orji (USA), 14.46 m (47-5 1/4); 8. Patricia Mamona (POR), 14.40 m (47-3). Also: 9. Tori Franklin (USA), 14.08 , (46 2 1/2).

Shot: 1. Lijiao Gong (CHN), 19.55 m (64-1 3/4); 2. Danniel Thomas-Dodd (JAM), 19.47 m (63-10 1/2); 3. Christina Schwanitz (GER), 19.17 m (62-10 3/4); 4. Maggie Ewen (USA), 18.93 m (62-1 1/4); 5. Anita Marton (HUN), 18.86 m (61-10 1/2); 6. Aliona Dubitskaya (BLR), 18.86 m (61-10 1/2); 7. Chase Ealey (USA), 18.82 m (61-9); 8. Brittany Crew (CAN), 18.55 m (60-10 1/2). Also: 9. Michelle Carter (USA), 18.41 m (60-4 3/4).

Discus: 1. Jaime Perez (CUB), 69.17 m (226-11); 2. Denia Caballero (CUB), 68.44 m (224-6); 3. Sandra Perkovic (CRO), 66.72 m (218-11 ); 5. Yang Chen (CHN), 63.38 m (207-11); 6. Bin Feng (CHN), 62.48 m (205-0); 7. Fernanda Martins (BRA), 62.44 m (204-10); 8. Valarie Allman (USA), 61.82 m (202-10).

Hammer: 1. DeAnna Price (USA), 77.54 m (251-1); 2. Joanna Fiodorow (POL), 76.35 m (250-6); 3. Zheng Wang (CHN), 74.76 m (245-3); 4. Zalina Petrivskaya (MDA), 74.33 m (243-10); 5. Iryna Klymets (UKR), 73.56 m (241-4); 6. Alexandra Tavernier (FRA), 73.33 m (240-7); 7. Hanna Skydan (AZE), 72.83 m (238-11); 8. Na Luo (CHN), 72.04 m (236-4).

Javelin: 1. Kelsey-Lee Barber (AUS), 66.56 m (218-4); 2. Shiyeng Liu (CHN), 65.88 m (216-2); 3. Huihui Lyu (CHN), 65.49 m (214-10); 4. Christin Hussong (GER), 65.21 m (213-11); 5. Kara Winger (USA), 63.23 m (207-5); 6. Tatsiana Khaladovich (BLR), 62.54 m (205-2); 7. Sara Kolak (CRO), 62.28 m (204-4); 8. Annu Rani (IND), 61.12 m (200-6).

Heptathlon: 1. Katarina Johnson-Thompson (GBR), 6,981; 2. Nafi Thiam (BEL), 6,677; 3. Verena Preiner (AUT), 6,560; 4. Erica Bougard (USA), 6,470; 5. Kendell Williams (USA), 6.415; 6. Nadine Broersen (NED), 6,392; 7. Emma Oosterwegel (NED), 6,250; 8. Odite Ahouanwanou (BEN), 6,210. Also: 12. Chari Hawkins (USA), 6,073; 13. Annie Kunz (USA), 6,067.

Mixed

4×400 m: 1. United States (Wil London, Allyson Felix, Courtney Okolo, Michael Cherry), 3:09.34 (World Record; old, 3:12.42, U.S. in semis); 2. Jamaica, (Allen, McGregor, James, Francis), 3:11.78; 3. Bahrain (Isah, Jamal, Naser, Abbas), 3:11.82; 4. Great Britain, 3:12.27; 5. Poland, 3:12.33; 6. Belgium, 3:14.22; 7. India, 3:15.77; 8. Brazil, 3:16.22.

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